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Equus

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  • Orchestra
  • Wind Ensemble
  • SATB Choir Accompaniment

Orchestra

Duration

9 minutes

Year of Composition

2012

Licensing

Boosey & Hawkes

Note from Composer

At the Midwest Band and Orchestra convention in 1996, Gary Green approached me about a possible commission for his wind ensemble at the University of Miami. I accepted, and the commission formally began July 1st, 1997. Two years later I still couldn’t show him a single note.

That’s not to say I hadn’t written anything. On the contrary, I had about 100 pages of material for three different pieces, but I wanted to give Gary something very special and just couldn’t find that perfect spark.

Around this time my great friend and fellow Juilliard composer Steven Bryant was visiting me in Los Angeles, and as I had just bought a new computer I was throwing out old sequencer files, most of them sketches and improvisational ideas. As I played one section Steve dashed into the room and the following conversation ensued:

Steve: “What the hell was that!?!”
Me: “Just an old idea I’m about to trash.”
Steve: “Mark my words, If you don’t use that I’m stealing it.”

The gauntlet had been thrown.

That was the spark, but it took me a full eight months to write the piece. There are a LOT of notes, and I put every one on paper (with pencil). I wanted to write a moto perpetuo, a piece that starts running and never stops (‘equus’ is the Latin word for horse) and would also be a virtuosic show piece for winds. The final result is something that I call “dynamic minimalism,” which basically means that I love to employ repetitive patterns as long as they don’t get boring. We finally premiered the piece in March 2000, nearly three years after the original commission date, and the University of Miami Wind Ensemble played the bejeezus out of it. Equus is dedicated to my friend Gary Green, the most passionate and patient conductor I know.

Optional chorus accompaniment parts are also available through Boosey & Hawkes.

Instrumentation

Flutes 1, 2 & 3 (3rd doubling Piccolo)
Oboes 1, 2 & 3 (3rd doubling Cor Anglais)
Clarinet in E
Clarinets in B 1, 2 & 3
Bassoons 1, 2 & 3
Trumpets in B 1, 2 & 3
Horns in F 1-4
Trombones 1, 2 & 3 (3rd Bass)
Tuba
Timpani
Percussion 1-4
Crotales (+ rubber mallets)
Suspended Cymbal
Xylophone
Triangle
Bass Drum
Marimba
Glockenspiel
Finger Cymbals
Tam-tam
Crash Cymbal
Tambourine
Vibraphone
Chimes
Slap Stick
Snare Drum
Harp
Piano
Violin I
Violin II
Viola
Violincello
Contrabass

Wind Ensemble

Duration

9 minutes

Year of Composition

2000

Difficulty

Level 5

Licensing

Boosey & Hawkes

Purchase

Hal Leonard

Perusal Score

View

Note from Composer

At the Midwest Band and Orchestra convention in 1996, Gary Green approached me about a possible commission for his wind ensemble at the University of Miami. I accepted, and the commission formally began July 1st, 1997. Two years later I still couldn’t show him a single note.

That’s not to say I hadn’t written anything. On the contrary, I had about 100 pages of material for three different pieces, but I wanted to give Gary something very special and just couldn’t find that perfect spark.

Around this time my great friend and fellow Juilliard composer Steven Bryant was visiting me in Los Angeles, and as I had just bought a new computer I was throwing out old sequencer files, most of them sketches and improvisational ideas. As I played one section Steve dashed into the room and the following conversation ensued:

Steve: “What the hell was that!?!”
Me: “Just an old idea I’m about to trash.”
Steve: “Mark my words, If you don’t use that I’m stealing it.”

The gauntlet had been thrown.

That was the spark, but it took me a full eight months to write the piece. There are a LOT of notes, and I put every one on paper (with pencil). I wanted to write a moto perpetuo, a piece that starts running and never stops (‘equus’ is the Latin word for horse) and would also be a virtuosic show piece for winds. The final result is something that I call “dynamic minimalism,” which basically means that I love to employ repetitive patterns as long as they don’t get boring. We finally premiered the piece in March 2000, nearly three years after the original commission date, and the University of Miami Wind Ensemble played the bejeezus out of it. Equus is dedicated to my friend Gary Green, the most passionate and patient conductor I know.

 

The following amendements need to be made when performing the band parts with the accompanying choral parts.

Following composer revisions in 2012, please note re-barring and new time signatures from bar 131.

Band score and parts should be amended as below so they match SATB chorus scores:

131: now 5 bars of 3/4

136: now 1 bar of 4/4

136a: now 1 bar of 5/4 (2+3)

From bar 137 onwards, score as written.

I.E. This adds an extra bar; the new 5/4 = bar “136a”

Instrumentation

Flutes 1, 2 & 3 (3rd doubling Piccolo)
Oboes 1 & 2
English Horn
Clarinet in E
Clarinets in B 1, 2 & 3
Bass Clarinet
Contrabass Clarinet in B
Bassoons 1 & 2
Contrabassoon
Alto Saxophones 1 & 2
Tenor Saxophone
Baritone Saxophone
Trumpets in B 1, 2 & 3
Horns in F 1-4
Trombones 1 & 2
Bass Trombone
Baritone
Tuba
Harp
Piano
Timpani
Glass Chimes
Percussion 1
Crotales
Bass Drum
Tamborine
Glockenspiel
Marimba
Suspended Cymbal
Slap Stick
Snare Drum
Xylophone
Percussion 2
Triangle
Finger Cymbals
Crash Cymbals
Vibraphone
Suspended Cymbal
Tam-Tam
Chimes
Bass Drum
Percussion 3
Marimba
Xylophone
Tam-Tam
Crotales
Glockenspiel
Percussion 4
Marimba
Xylophone
Tam-Tam
Crotales
Glockenspiel

Perusal Score

SATB Choir Accompaniment

Duration

9 minutes

Year of Composition

2012

Licensing

Boosey & Hawkes

Purchase

Hal Leonard

Note from Composer

At the Midwest Band and Orchestra convention in 1996, Gary Green approached me about a possible commission for his wind ensemble at the University of Miami. I accepted, and the commission formally began July 1st, 1997. Two years later I still couldn’t show him a single note.

That’s not to say I hadn’t written anything. On the contrary, I had about 100 pages of material for three different pieces, but I wanted to give Gary something very special and just couldn’t find that perfect spark.

Around this time my great friend and fellow Juilliard composer Steven Bryant was visiting me in Los Angeles, and as I had just bought a new computer I was throwing out old sequencer files, most of them sketches and improvisational ideas. As I played one section Steve dashed into the room and the following conversation ensued:

Steve: “What the hell was that!?!”
Me: “Just an old idea I’m about to trash.”
Steve: “Mark my words, If you don’t use that I’m stealing it.”

The gauntlet had been thrown.

That was the spark, but it took me a full eight months to write the piece. There are a LOT of notes, and I put every one on paper (with pencil). I wanted to write a moto perpetuo, a piece that starts running and never stops (‘equus’ is the Latin word for horse) and would also be a virtuosic show piece for winds. The final result is something that I call “dynamic minimalism,” which basically means that I love to employ repetitive patterns as long as they don’t get boring. We finally premiered the piece in March 2000, nearly three years after the original commission date, and the University of Miami Wind Ensemble played the bejeezus out of it. Equus is dedicated to my friend Gary Green, the most passionate and patient conductor I know.

The following amendements need to be made when performing the band parts with the accompanying choral parts.

Following composer revisions in 2012, please note re-barring and new time signatures from bar 131.

Band score and parts should be amended as below so they match SATB chorus scores:

131: now 5 bars of 3/4

136: now 1 bar of 4/4

136a: now 1 bar of 5/4 (2+3)

From bar 137 onwards, score as written.

I.E. This adds an extra bar; the new 5/4 = bar “136a”